Category Archives: National News

EPA Agrees Its Emissions Estimates From Flaring May Be Flawed

Agency says it will re-examine the formulas it uses, based on data provided by industry, and people near oil and gas sites hope that means cleaner air.

BY DAVID HASEMYER

Emissions from the widespread practice of flaring has been a matter of dispute with the EPA, with several environmental groups successfully pressuring the agency to consider recalculating its estimates. Credit: Getty Images
Emissions from the widespread practice of flaring has been a matter of dispute with the EPA, with several environmental groups successfully pressuring the agency to consider recalculating its estimates. Credit: Getty Images

***This could be important for the flares at the Bridgeton Landfill.***
A lot of Volatile Organic Compounds VOC’s are being produced by the fire..
Just Moms STL
 

 

 

Two Stay-at-Home Moms Are Waging War Against the Feds Over Illegal Toxic Waste, 06/01/2016

The Vice
by Amy Martyn

Two Stay-at-Home Moms Are Waging War Against the Feds Over Illegal Toxic Waste
PHOTO BY CHRISTEN COMMUSO

What do you do when there’s 10,000 barrels of illegally dumped uranium two miles away from your home and the government tells you not to worry about it?

Dawn Chapman and her family are stuck in an absurd and depressing situation:  Less than two miles from the Chapmans’ neighborhood in Bridgeton, Missouri, sits a landfill where radioactive uranium was illegally dumped by a government contractor forty years ago. Since the Environmental Protection Agency is not required to warn people of such things, most people in the area—including many elected officials—knew nothing about the dump for decades.

“It would be great to be able to leave this area, but we couldn’t honestly sell our house right now, ” Chapman says. “Even ethically, with what’s going on, I wouldn’t want to sell my house to another family.” Continue reading Two Stay-at-Home Moms Are Waging War Against the Feds Over Illegal Toxic Waste, 06/01/2016

Radioactive Hot Spot Prompts Researchers’ Concerns, 04/28/2016

The Wall Street Journal
by John R. Emshwiller

Contractors for the Army Corps of Engineers collect samples at Coldwater Creek in Missouri’s St. Louis County in 2015. Private researchers say their sampling suggests contamination from a radioactive hot spot is getting into the creek, then heading to residents’ yards downstream.
Contractors for the Army Corps of Engineers collect samples at Coldwater Creek in Missouri’s St. Louis County in 2015. Private researchers say their sampling suggests contamination from a radioactive hot spot is getting into the creek, then heading to residents’ yards downstream. PHOTO: U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

About a mile from homes in Missouri’s St. Louis County lies a radioactive hot spot with contamination levels hundreds of times above federal safety guidelines. But there are no plans to clean it up.

That is because the location, tainted with waste from atomic-weapons work done in local factories decades ago, has been deemed by the federal government to be effectively inaccessible and not a threat. Continue reading Radioactive Hot Spot Prompts Researchers’ Concerns, 04/28/2016

STL landfill fire nears collision with radioactive waste: What’s next? 04/18/2016

Occasional Planet
by Gloria Shur Bilchik

radioactive landfill
Westlake Landfill, St. Louis MO

What happens when a landfill fire meets a radioactive waste dump?  St. Louis, Missouri, may be the first metropolitan area to find out.

In North St. Louis County, near the St. Louis Airport, and a mile from Pattonville High School, the Westlake Landfill is on fire. It’s not a flaming, above-ground fire, but something more insidious and potentially more dangerous: a smoldering underground fire caused by years of decomposing garbage, the methane gas it produces, and the oxygen that has seeped in. Continue reading STL landfill fire nears collision with radioactive waste: What’s next? 04/18/2016

Ghosts Of Hiroshima Haunt Fuming Landfill Near Ferguson, Missouri, 04/13/2016

Seattle Medium
by Josh Peterson
Urban News Service

web - misourri picBy Josh Peterson
Urban News Service

BRIDGETON, Mo. – Outside Ferguson, Missouri, another issue burns. This time, it’s environmental.

An underground fire smolders toward radioactive waste tied to the atomic bombs that leveled Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This subterranean inferno threatens to sicken area residents, just 10 miles from the site of the controversial, police-involved death of Michael Brown.

Local citizens worry the slowly advancing fire, which has burned at the Bridgeton Landfill since 2010, will reach the World War II-era nuclear refuse at the neighboring West Lake Landfill. Continue reading Ghosts Of Hiroshima Haunt Fuming Landfill Near Ferguson, Missouri, 04/13/2016

EPA: Radioactive Material in Unexpected Places at Landfill, 03/24/2016

ABC News
by the Associated Press

Radioactive material buried near an underground fire at a suburban St. Louis landfill has been found in areas where it was previously not suspected, but there is no increased health risk to residents or workers, Environmental Protection Agency officials said Thursday.

The EPA released the first phase report of an investigation of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton where nuclear waste dating to the Manhattan Project was illegally dumpedin the 1970s. Adding to the concern is the fact that an underground fire is smoldering at the adjacent Bridgeton Landfill.

The investigation found “radiologically impacted material” in “areas of the landfill not identified during previous site investigations,” but not present in areas previously presumed to contain it, the EPA said. Continue reading EPA: Radioactive Material in Unexpected Places at Landfill, 03/24/2016

Underground Fire in Mo. Nears Nuclear Waste Dump, 02/18/2016

Discovery.com
by Patrick J. Kiger

Contractors clear vegetation and survey gamma radiation at the West Lake Landfill, a Superfund site in Missouri, in 2013.

In the St. Louis area, a slow-burning underground fire is close to a vast store of nuclear waste buried in a federal Superfund site.

The fire reportedly has been smoldering beneath a nearby landfill since at least 2010. The Washington Post reports that residents are afraid of what may happen if the fire — which is by some accounts as little as 1,500 feet away –reaches the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo., a Superfund site filled with decades-old waste from the federal government’s nuclear weapons program. Angry locals also think the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which manages the site, hasn’t done enough to stop the fire. Continue reading Underground Fire in Mo. Nears Nuclear Waste Dump, 02/18/2016

An underground fire is burning near radioactive waste. Don’t worry, EPA says. 02/16/2016

The Washington Post
by Darryl Fears

Trevor Beckermann, 6, who suffers from the autoimmune disease alopecia areata, plays the board game Life with his mother Meagan Beckermann, 34, at home in Bridgeton, Mo. Meagan says the condition, which results in extreme hair loss, appeared after the family moved to Bridgeton, a St. Louis suburb located near a landfill and Superfund site. (Sid Hastings for The Washington Post)

Trevor Beckermann, 6, who suffers from the autoimmune disease alopecia areata, plays the board game Life with his mother Meagan Beckermann, 34, at home in Bridgeton, Mo. Meagan says the condition, which results in extreme hair loss, appeared after the family moved to Bridgeton, a St. Louis suburb located near a landfill and Superfund site. (Sid Hastings for The Washington Post)
Her first clue that something was wrong came as she ran her hands through her baby boy’s hair. “My child was losing his hair in clumps,” Meagan Beckermann recalls. A doctor traced the problem to alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that can be triggered by environmental factors. Continue reading An underground fire is burning near radioactive waste. Don’t worry, EPA says. 02/16/2016

Moms from St. Louis, Flint want EPA response to respective crises, 02/09/16

ABC12.com
by Peter Zampa

WASHINGTON (Gray DC) – (02/09/16) – A coalition of moms traveled to Washington, D.C. to question the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) response to the water crisis in Flint, MI and a radioactive waste problem in a suburb of St. Louis, MO. The moms are worried for their families, who they say have been irreparably contaminated in the two crises. Continue reading Moms from St. Louis, Flint want EPA response to respective crises, 02/09/16

Senate bill to shift oversight of nuclear waste in landfill, 02/03/2016

The Washington Times
by Jim Salter, The Associated Press

This photo taken Aug. 28, 2015 shows a membrane covering hundreds of feet of garbage and various pipes that direct leachate to a treatment plant at the Bridgeton Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo. The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, ordered surface fire prevention measures at the St. Louis-area landfill where nuclear waste was illegally dumped four decades ago. (Huy Mach/The St. Louis Post Dispatch via AP)
This photo taken Aug. 28, 2015 shows a membrane covering hundreds of feet of garbage and various pipes that direct leachate to a treatment plant at the Bridgeton Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo. The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday, Dec. 10, … more >

ST. LOUIS (AP) – The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that could transfer oversight of a St. Louis County landfill containing nuclear waste to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and away from the jurisdiction of the Environmental Protection Agency.

The measure passed Tuesday still needs approval from the House, where two members from the St. Louis area, Republican Ann Wagner and Democrat William Lacy Clay, have introduced companion legislation. Continue reading Senate bill to shift oversight of nuclear waste in landfill, 02/03/2016

Senate Passes Blunt, McCaskill Bill to Help West Lake Families, 02/02/2016

aYVJawj

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators Roy Blunt (Mo.) and Claire McCaskill (Mo.) today applauded Senate passage of their bill, S. 2306, to transfer remediation authority over the West Lake landfill from the Environmental Protection Agency to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, putting the site in the Corps’ Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Missouri Representatives Wm. Lacy Clay and Ann Wagner have introduced companion legislation in the House.

“The families living near the West Lake landfill have made clear that they are fed up with the EPA’s long delay in implementing a plan to clean up the site,” Blunt said. “The EPA has lost credibility within the community, and left parents living in fear for their children’s health and safety. That is completely unacceptable. The Senate has taken an important step by voting to give the Corps the authority to utilize its knowledge and expertise on clean-up efforts, which I hope will begin to give families the peace of mind they deserve.” Continue reading Senate Passes Blunt, McCaskill Bill to Help West Lake Families, 02/02/2016

Fire burns through the night at Republic Service’s Sugar Creek landfill, 01/28/2016

The Kansas City Star
by Robert A. Cronkleton

The fire at the Courtney Ridge Recycling and Disposal Facility was first reported about 11 p.m. Wednesday and continued to burn Thursday.
The fire at the Courtney Ridge Recycling and Disposal Facility was first reported about 11 p.m. Wednesday and continued to burn Thursday.

A fire at the Courtney Ridge Recycling and Disposal Facility in Sugar Creek burned through the night and into Thursday.

A passer-by noticed the fire at the landfill at 1701 N. Missouri 291 shortly before 11 p.m. and called 911. Continue reading Fire burns through the night at Republic Service’s Sugar Creek landfill, 01/28/2016

UPDATE: Residents frustrated by EPA’s isolation barrier plan for West Lake Landfill, 01/11/2016

WasteDive.com
by Arlene Karidis

UPDATE: Despite plans to build an underground barrier between Bridgeton Landfill and West Lake Landfill, residents have reported to be frustrated and claim the fire-prevention efforts are not enough, according to International Business Times and Al Jazeera.

“It’s looking more and more like removal is the only way to guarantee [a safe solution],” said local resident Dawn Chapman to Al Jazeera. “Life’s over for [people] in this community. They can’t live where they are. They can’t enjoy it.”

Ed Smith, representative of the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, agreed with Chapman, stating, “The only way to guarantee the radioactive content will never come in contact with the subsurface fire in the future is to remove the radioactive material … We’ve watched the EPA work on the barrier plan now for almost two years whereas they could have been planning for the removal of the radioactive waste.” Continue reading UPDATE: Residents frustrated by EPA’s isolation barrier plan for West Lake Landfill, 01/11/2016

St. Louis anxious about EPA plan for barrier between fire, toxic waste, 01/08/2016

Aljazeera America.com
by Ryan Schuessler

Statement on barrier between underground fire and radioactive waste comes after study shows contamination is spreading

Those living near a landfill complex in suburban St. Louis where an underground fire is burning near Cold War-era nuclear weapons waste say they remain afraid and frustrated despite a government pledge to build a barrier between the two.

In the past, tests have found radioactive materials in the complex that were previously unknown to regulators, raising fears that the extent of the contamination — in terms of severity and location — remains unclear. Maintaining that its data is sound, the EPA, which has regulatory oversight over the West Lake Landfill, announced on Dec. 31 that it is moving forward with a plan to build an isolation barrier between the fire and known waste, but many residents and environmentalists are worried that is too little too late. Continue reading St. Louis anxious about EPA plan for barrier between fire, toxic waste, 01/08/2016

Study Finds Radioactive Waste at St. Louis-Area Landfill Has Migrated Off-Site, 01/02/2016

NASDAQ.com
Dow Jones Business News
by John R. Emshwiller and Gary Fields

Shutterstock photo

Radioactive contamination from a St. Louis-area landfill containing nuclear-weapons-related waste likely has migrated off-site, according to a study published this week in a scientific journal.

One of the authors of the private, peer-reviewed study, which appeared Tuesday in the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, said he doesn’t see any immediate health risks posed by the contamination that appears to be seeping from the West Lake landfill in Bridgeton, Mo.

West Lake’s owner, Republic Services Inc., as well as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, have said their radiation sampling hasn’t shown evidence of the site posing a threat to the public. A Republic spokesman deferred any comment on the study–which was funded a by St. Louis-area activist, Kay Drey, who has been critical of keeping the radioactive waste at West Lake–to the EPA. Continue reading Study Finds Radioactive Waste at St. Louis-Area Landfill Has Migrated Off-Site, 01/02/2016

EPA orders barrier installed to protect nuclear waste from underground fire near St. Louis, 01/02/2016

Los Angeles Times
by Associated Press

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has ordered the installation of an isolation barrier to make sure that an underground fire does not reach buried nuclear waste at a suburban St. Louis landfill.

Mark Hague, EPA regional administrator, who announced the move Thursday, said the plan for West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton also calls for additional engineering steps, such as cooling loops. The barrier will consist of an underground wall.

Nuclear waste dating to the Manhattan Project was dumped at West Lake in 1973. An underground fire has been smoldering for years and is now within 1,200 feet. Continue reading EPA orders barrier installed to protect nuclear waste from underground fire near St. Louis, 01/02/2016

The Looming Environmental Disaster in Missouri that Nobody is Talking About, 01/02/2016

AntiMedia.org
Claire Bernish

(ANTIMEDIA) St. Louis, MO — What happens when radioactive byproduct from the Manhattan Project comes into contact with an “underground fire” at a landfill? Surprisingly, no one actually knows for sure; but residents of Bridgeton, Missouri, near the West Lake and Bridgeton Landfills — just northwest of the St. Louis International Airport — may find out sooner than they’d like.

And that conundrum isn’t the only issue for the area. Contradicting reports from both the government and the landfill’s responsible parties, radioactive contamination is actively leaching into the surrounding populated area from the West Lake site — and likely has been for the past 42 years.

In order to grasp this startling confluence of circumstances, it’s important to understand the history of these sites. Pertinent information either hasn’t been forthcoming or is muddied by disputes among the various government agencies and companies that should be held accountable for keeping area residents safe. Continue reading The Looming Environmental Disaster in Missouri that Nobody is Talking About, 01/02/2016